De eerste christenen

You say it helps you a lot to wonder how many businessmen have become saints since the time of the early Christians. And you want to show that it is also possible today... —The Lord will not abandon you in that effort.

All these with one accord devoted themselves to prayer, together with the women and Mary the mother of Jesus, and with his brethren… And they devoted themselves to the Apostles’ teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers… The company of those who believed were of one heart and soul. (Acts 1:14; 2:42; 4:32).

MASACCIO, St Peter healing the sick with his shadow, 1426-7

One single heart

Pray to God that in the Holy Church, our Mother, the hearts of all may be one heart, as they were in the earliest times of Christianity; so that the words of Scripture may be truly fulfilled until the end of the ages: Multitudinis autem credentium erat cor unum et anima una — the company of the faithful were of one heart and one soul.

—I am saying this to you in all seriousness: may this holy unity not come to any harm through you. Take it to your prayer!

The Forge, 632

'Salute all the saints. All the saints send you greetings. To all the saints who are at Ephesus. To all the saints in Christ Jesus who are at Philippi.' — What a moving name — saints! — the early Christians used to address to each other!...

Learn to be a brother to your brothers.

The Way, 469

Like the early Christians

I think so highly of your devotion to the early Christians that I will do all I can to encourage it, so that you — like them — will put more enthusiasm each day into that effective apostolate of discretion and friendship.

The Way, 971

Just as observant religious are eager to know how the first of their order or congregation lived, so as to have their model to follow you too, christian gentleman, should also seek to know and imitate the lives of the disciples of Jesus, who knew Peter and Paul and John, and all but witnessed the Death and Resurrection of the Master.

The Way, 925

You say it helps you a lot to wonder how many businessmen have become saints since the time of the early Christians.

And you want to show that it is also possible today... —The Lord will not abandon you in that effort.

Furrow, 490

Taking the Christian vocation seriously

If you want a point of comparison, the easiest way to understand Opus Dei is to consider the life of the early Christians. They lived their Christian vocation seriously, seeking earnestly the holiness to which they had been called by their Baptism. Externally they did nothing to distinguish themselves from their fellow citizens. The members of Opus Dei are ordinary people. They work like everyone else and live in the midst of the world just as they did before they joined. There is nothing false or artificial about their behaviour. They live like any other Christian citizen who wants to respond fully to the demands of his faith, because that is what they are.

Conversations, 24

What amazes you seems natural to me— that God has sought you out in the practice of your profession!

That is how he sought the first, Peter and Andrew, James and John, beside their nets, and Matthew, sitting in the custom-house.

And — wonder of wonders! — Paul, in his eagerness to destroy the seed of the Christians.

The Way, 799

Loving the Church

We need to shout out loudly today — time and again those bold words of Saint Peter to a group of important people in Jerusalem: This is the stone which was rejected by you builders, but which has become the head of the comer. And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved.

Thus spoke the first Pope, the rock on which Christ built his Church. He was moved to do so by his filial devotion to the Lord and by his solicitude for the little flock entrusted to him. From him and from the rest of the Apostles, the first Christians learned to love the Church tenderly.

In Love With the Church, 29

To follow in Christ’s footsteps, today’s apostle does not need to reform anything, but even less has he to take no part in the contemporary affairs going on around him. —He has only to act as the first Christians did, and give life to his environment.

Furrow, 320